Tips for a good wedding photo

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Not many guests are paying attention to all of your techniques and angles. Some may catch a glimpse of you taking a picture here or there. After all, several photos are posed. You have the cake cutting, bouquet/garter toss or maybe you take photos of small groups where your subjects are looking directly at the camera. Family and group photos are important in a wedding. Everyone is going to be looking out for those because everyone is in them and they remember standing there waiting for you to take the picture.

The reason group photos should always come out great, is because you should have everyone in front of you standing completely still. Although it’s easier said than done, you to avoid taking photos where someone’s eyes are closed or they are looking out into space. Many times, this happens because one of the guests is behind you trying to take the same picture. The trick is to nip it in the bud before the wedding even begins. On way to achieve this is by letting the bride and groom know during the consultation that there should be no other photographers taking photos during the group photo session. To let others take photos after you have taken your photo is totally up to you. You may want to tell your clients to inform the bridesmaids and groomsmen about this practice. Many times, you will find that someone runs up behind you with a camera and you don’t have to say a thing. One of her loyal bridesmaids will likely act as a watchdog for you.

Make sure to scout the venue well before hand so that you can be ready at a moment’s notice as to where to pose the group. It looks very unprofessional to pace back and forth looking for a place. Find a spot and talk to your clients about it before the wedding.

It’s important to check the details. A quick checklist that includes the bridesmaid’s bouquets (you want them all on the same level), men’s cuffs, items on the ground, people out of place and all eyes on you.

Now that you have everyone’s attention lighten the mood and let everyone know that they’re going to look great. Some photographers do a count to three. When you get to three, everyone’s eyes should be looking directly at the camera. Take two or three of the same shot and go on to the next group of people.

These are basic tips that will help you take better wedding family and group portraits and to become a better wedding photographer. Not only will your group photos look better, but you will have fun taking them.